County Limerick To Host National Pool Lifesaving Championships

(Press Release Ireland — February 11, 2008) —

Co. Limerick, Ireland — 11 Feb. 2008 — County Limerick, 11th February 2008 – Some of Ireland’s fittest Lifesavers will compete in Irish Water Safety’s National Pool Lifesaving Championships at the National University of Limerick’s 50-metre Arena Pool on Saturday 16th February 2008.

The Championships, which are being supported by Limerick County Council, are part of Irish Water Safety’s extensive programme to promote water safety in Ireland with a particular focus on the necessary skills required by lifeguards nationwide.

The 12.30–6pm event sees various teams from counties around Ireland competing in a rigorous series of races, which simulate conditions that lifesavers often encounter in real life rescues.

Commenting ahead of the upcoming Championships, Cllr. Kevin Sheahan, Cathaoirleach of Limerick County Council stated, “Limerick County Council is mindful of the need to actively promote water safety and to support events that remind members of the public about the importance of acting safely around water. Therefore, the local authority is delighted to pledge its support to the upcoming event.”

The Cathaoirleach, who is a member of Askeaton Swimming Club and whose son Kevin is a Lifesaver, added that the event would again help underline County Limerick’s growing status as a location for prestigious national and international sporting events.

“County Limerick has a proud sporting tradition and is known as a friendly location for visitors. We also possess Ireland’s largest indoor sports complex at the University of Limerick. These three factors combined make Limerick an ideal location for a national competition of this size. It is especially significant that up to 70 competitors from Clare, Waterford, Belfast, Wicklow, Kildare, Kilkenny, Galway, Cork, Mayo, Wexford and Limerick, will be participating in the competition”, concluded Councillor Sheahan.

Meanwhile, the Championships will feature a world record attempt by Norma Cahill from Clare. The current World Record Holder in the 50-metre manikin and the 200-metre obstacle events is attempting a third world record in the 100 meter manikin carry with fins and has a time to beat of 1min16.76secs.

Order of Events
Obstacle races involve passing under two obstacles
1. 100m obstacle Junior (u16) + Masters over 55
2. 200m obstacle Senior + Masters
3. 4 x 50m obstacle Relay. Junior, Senior, Masters
4. 100m manikin carry + fins Senior, Masters
5. 50m manikin carry Senior, Masters
6. 2 x 50m water safety carry Relay Juniors
7. 100m rescue medley Senior
8. 100m manikin tow + fins Senior, Masters
9. 200m Super lifesaver Senior
10. 4 x 25m manikin relay Junior, Senior
11. 4 x 50m medley relay Senior, Masters

According to Irish Water Safety, the Championships encourage young athletes to enrol in one of IWS’s many courses nationwide in the valuable skills of swimming, rescue and lifesaving. Many participants go on to work in swimming pools and leisure centres in Ireland and abroad.

Irish Water Safety encourages everyone to take swimming, water safety and rescue classes. For further information on the upcoming Championships or any aspect of water safety contact Irish Water Safety, The Long Walk, Galway, at 091-564400/[email protected] or visit www.iws.ie

-ENDS-

Notes to Editor:
– Councillor Kevin Sheahan, Cathaoirleach of Limerick County Council (087-2926333), John Leech, Irish Water Safety (087-6789600) and/or Roger Sweeney, Irish Water Safety (087-6789601) are available for interview and further comment.
– An introductory explanation of the different events:
200 m Obstacle Swim -The competitor swims 200 m in freestyle during which he/she swims under eight (8) immersed obstacles.
50 m Manikin Carry – The competitor swims 25 m freestyle and then dives to recover a submerged manikin to the surface within 5 m of the pick-up line. The competitor then carries the manikin to the finish edge of the pool.
100 m Rescue Medley – The competitor swims 50 m freestyle to turn, dive, and swim underwater to a submerged manikin located at 20 m distance for men and 15m distance for women. The competitor surfaces the manikin within the 5 m pick-up line, and then carries it the remaining distance to the finish edge of the pool.
100 m Manikin Carry with Fins – The competitor swims 50 m freestyle wearing fins and then dives to recover a submerged manikin to the surface within 10 m of the turning edge. The competitor carries the manikin to the finish edge of the pool.
100 m Manikin Tow with Fins – The competitor swims 50 m freestyle with fins and rescue tube. After touching the turning edge, the competitor fixes the rescue tube around a manikin floating at the surface at the edge and tows it to the finish.
200 m Super Lifesaver – The competitor swims 75 m freestyle and then dives to recover a submerged manikin. The competitor surfaces the manikin within 5 m of the pick-up line and carries it to the turning edge. After touching the wall the competitor releases the manikin. In the water, the competitor dons fins and rescue tube within 5 m of the turning edge and swims 50 m freestyle. After touching the wall the competitor fixes the rescue tube around a floating manikin within 5 m of the turning edge and tows it to touch the finish edge of the pool.
Line Throw – In this timed event, the competitor throws an unweighted line to a fellow team member located in the water approximately 12 m distant and pulls this “victim” back to the poolside.
4×25m Manikin Relay – Four competitors in turn carry a manikin approximately 25 m each.
4×50 m Obstacle Relay – Four competitors swim 50 m freestyle each passing under two (2) obstacles.
4×50 m Medley Relay – The first competitor swims 50 m freestyle without fins. The second competitor swims 50 m freestyle with fins. The third competitor swims 50 m freestyle pulling a rescue tube and after having touched the wall, passes the harness of the rescue tube to a fourth competitor who wears fins. The third competitor, playing the role of “victim,” holds the rescue tube with both hands, while being towed 50 m by the fourth competitor to the finish.

 

 
Ireland